Why Hinge may be the dating app of 2021

by Natalie Lim

It’s 2021 and if you’re tired of the endless swiping, superficial chats and promising dates that eventually turn out to be disappointments, Hinge may be just for you.

We live in an era where millennials are oh-so-tired of modern dating. Dating apps may offer you an unlimited choice of potential partners, but just like an open-world Role Playing Game (RPG), sometimes, having too much of an option does distract you from your actual quest.

Of course, we’re talking about finding your one true love—what else are dating apps for, right?

Hinge, the Instagram of dating apps

Photo: Screen grab from Hinge

Hinge titled itself the “Instagram of dating apps”, where users create their profile based on three questions that’ll give potential partners a glimpse of their personalities.

Photo: Screen grab from Hinge

In a society where millennials connect through memes, dark humour and banter, the profiling questions show that it isn’t all about good looks. Kind of like Cards of Humanity where you choose someone with the best answer.

Photo: Screen grab from Hinge

To get someone’s attention, you can “like” their photo or reply to their answers. If they respond, it’s a match.

If not, the other great feature of Hinge is that conversations can only be started if someone replies to an action you’ve taken. So there’ll be no more streams of

“Hi. You there?” floating around in your chat box, and no more hopelessly waiting for a reply.

Photo: Screen grab from Hinge

Tangible connections with people you may actually know

Hinge was designed as “an app to be deleted”, an app orientated towards fulfilling relationships rather than hookups. It understands that relationships must come from a certain touchpoint for it to seem more realistic—and what better way to do it than connect you with someone that friends know and can vouch for?

When connected to Facebook, the app’s algorithms try to match you with people you share Facebook friends with. But if you don’t have any friends, or I mean, if you’ve already made your way through all those potential matches, the app starts recommending more tangential connections—like people whose Facebook friends share Facebook friends with you.

Basically, the app focuses on people that are already on your social network.

Photo: Screen grab from Hinge

Though Hinge was created in 2012, it is significantly less popular and known than its competitors, namely Tinder, OkCupid and Coffee Meets Bagel.

“It’s on finding people you could actually date, whom you might ask out if you met at a mutual friend’s party. It’s all friends of friends,” Hinge founder, Justin McLeod said. “It’s quite hard to use it for casual encounters.”

Dogs in the above profile pictures are purely coincidental. Or perhaps they’ve caught on that I’m a dog lover. Keep the dogs coming.

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