11 hawker gems at Amoy Street Food Centre to takeaway before 3-month renovations from 11 Oct

by Evan Mua
amoy street food centre renovation 2021

Hawker centres are one of the few things that make life in the CBD less dull — dreaming about your favourite chicken rice or fish soup always helps time pass faster. If you’re one of the unlucky few who have to head back to the CBD every morning, consider heading down to Amoy Street Food Centre and dabao your lunch before they close for renovations.

The popular CBD mainstay will be undergoing renovations for 3 months from 11 October 2021, so you’d be missing your favourite eats for a while. While some popular stalls such as A Noodle Story has already started their break early, there are still plenty other great hawker gems for you to dig into — read on.

Han Kee Fish Soup

amoy street food centre renovation han kee fish soup
Photo: @eatabascooo/instagram

Fish soups stalls are often the ones with the longest lunch hour queues, and it’s no different here. If you’re a regular at Amoy Street Food Centre, you’d know of the iconic Han Kee Fish Soup queues.

For just S$5, you can get a bowl of clean and refreshing Fish Soup filled to the brim with firm, tender slices of mackerel — a satisfying lunch that won’t leave you guilty over grease.

πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #02-129 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 11am–3pm (Mon to Fri)

Mad Roasters

amoy street food centre renovation mad roaster
Photo: @thebreadaffair/instagram

For something different from your regular hawker fare and kopi pengs, check out Mad Roaster on the second storey. Their idea of “kopi & toast” involves unique bakes like Chocolate Babka (S$2) to pair with drinks such as Honey Butter Latte (S$4).

It’s started as a passion project by a lawyer to provide income to Thai refugees — so you’d not only be supporting a hawker business but also a charitable cause.

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πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #02-107 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 8am–3pm (Mon to Fri) 8am–1pm (Sat)

Kinobe

amoy street food centre renovation kinobe
Photo: @whatisdigesting/instagram

You know how there are so many Japanese-fusion cafes that promote themselves as places with affordable Japanese rice bowls? Kinobe beats all of them by offering wallet-friendly S$8 rice bowls, even in the heart of the CBD.

The stall is one of the few that sell Japanese food at Amoy Street Food Centre and is known for their Gyudon (S$8) which gives you a bang for your back with slices of tender beef and the creamy Mentaiko Salmon Don (S$11) is another hit with salmon lovers.

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πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #02-126 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 11pm–3pm (Mon to Fri)

Chop Chop Biryani

Photo: @eaterries/instagram

Biryani with pork? Probably something you’ve never heard of but this stall at Amoy Street Food Centre specialises in unique Chinese-Inidna Biryani so you can expect unconventional ingredients paired with the gravy-soaked rice.

At its base, it’s not that much different — you will find the same fluffy basmati rice that’s loaded with aromatic spice flavours. But the clincher comes in the form of meats that include Salted Egg Chicken, Siew Yoke, and even Pork Masala.

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πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #02-106 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 11am–3pm (Mon to Tues, Fri)

J2 Famous Crispy Curry Puff

Photo: @wengoriginade/instagram

Sure, curry puffs sound like boring ol’ snacks that you can just grab from your neighbourhood Old Chang Kee any time you want but J2 Famous Crispy Curry Puff is actually as famous as the name suggests — they were awarded a Michelin Bib Gourmand award.

What makes these Michelin-affirmed curry puffs worth your calories is their unbelievably flaky crust that just scatters everywhere when you bite down, to reveal a generous glut of fillings such as Curry Chicken (S$1.40), Sardine (S$1.40), and Black Pepper Chicken (S$1.60).

πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #01-21 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 8am–3pm (Mon to Fri)

Quan Ji

amoy street food centre renovation quan ji
Photo: @diningcompanion/instagram

Here’s where you go to get your hor fun fixes, and all things zi char, at the hawker centre. Quan Ji is a popular stall that sees a slew of returning regulars pining for some of that punchy wok hei.

You’d leave Amoy Street Food Centre satisfied just by ordering a plate of their decadent pepper-loaded signature Beef Hor Fun (S$5.50), but the real fans know the star here is the Wong Po Lou Meen (S$20) a secret off-menu item that features a silky yellow omelette covering a mound of al dente noodles.

πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #01-56/57 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 12pm–10:15pm (Wed to Fri), 4pm–10:15pm (Sat to Sun)

The Original Vadai

Photo: @thisiskliffered/instagram

With the restrictions in place due to covid, many of the popular pasar malam stalls couldn’t operate anymore and had to find new homes in hawker centres. The Original Vadai stall is one of them, finding its home in a few hawker centres in Singapore.

The unique snack is a type of fried fritter that originated from India, though they claim to be the originators of the Prawn Vadai (S$1). You can also find other toppings including Ikan Billis, Onion, and even Chocolate.

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πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #02-84 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 8:30am–3pm (Mon to Sat)

Hong Kee Beef Noodle

amoy street food centre renovation hong kee beef noodle
Photo: @culivinary/instagram

When it comes to famous stalls, the 2-storey Amoy Street Food Centre doesn’t lose out to any other hawker centre in Singapore. Besides the aforementioned curry puffs, there are another 3 more Michelin Bib Gourmand awardees — Hong Kee Beef Noodle is another.

With over 6 decades of history, you can’t go wrong with the flavourful Beef Noodles (S$6) here either in dry form or bathing in a steaming pool of rich broth that’s been cooked for 24 hours.

πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #01-42 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 11am–7:30pm (Mon to Fri), 9am–2:30pm (Sat to Sun)

Madam Leong Ban Mian

Photo: foodforfoong/instagram

There aren’t many more comforting and homely foods you can find than a piping hot bowl of ban mian. While the soup version is what many Singaporeans are familiar with, the dry rendition has been growing in popularity in recent years too.

If you’d like to dig into a flavourful bowl of sauce-drenched ban mian, then Madam Leong Ban Mian at Amoy Street Food Centre might catch your eye. Made by a Kuala Lumpur native, you can find authentic hearty Hakka flavours in the Dry Ban Mian (S$4) that uses noodles she makes by hand!

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πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #02-109 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 10am–2pm (Mon to Fri)

Fried Kway Teow

Photo: @hawmakase/instagram

With no name and just a stripped-down signboard, many passers-by would probably wonder if it’s worth ordering from Fried Kway Teow on the first floor of Amoy Street Food Centre. The short answer is yes.

What the humble facade doesn’t tell you is that the uncle behind the wok has had over sixty years of experience, that’s why you can see regulars lining up to feast on the decadent dark-sauce-loaded plates of Char Kway Teow (S$4/5).

πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #01-01 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 9:30am–2:30pm (Mon to Sat)

Ah Ter Teochew Fishball Noodles

Photo: @hungrlyn/instagram

From our experience, it seems every hawker centre will have at least 1 good fishball noodle or bak chor mee stall. At Amoy Street Food Centre, both of those are combined into a single stall — Ah Ter Teochew Fishball Noodles.

Unlike other fishball noodle stalls you’d regularly see, they specialise in handmade fishballs which sport a markedly bouncier texture. Their Fishball Noodles (S$4/5/6) are saucy affairs much like your typical bak chor mee, but complemented by those beautiful balls of fishy goodness.

πŸ“ 7 Maxwell Rd, #01-14 Amoy Street Food Centre, Singapore 069111
πŸ•’ 7am–3pm (Daily)

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